Akita Kanto Matsuri

The day after Morioka’s Sansa Odori, we decided to visit Kakunodate (角館町) in Akita Prefecture. Kakunodate is an old castle town with a preserved Samurai district and is famous for its cherry blossoms in spring.


Since we were in Akita and none of the udon shops were yet open for lunch, we decided to head onto Akita City for lunch.  Akita is famous for udon. Nothing hits the spot better than chilled udon on a hot summer day. It was excellent. Akita udon is Inaniwa style, which is thinner and less firm than the more popular Sanuki style udon.


All the major festivals of Tohoku (Akita’s Kanto, Sendai’s Tanabata, Aomori’s Nebuta, and Morioka’s Sansa) are held in the same week in August. At Akita City, the Kanto Festival (秋田竿燈まつり) was ongoing.  The Kanto is 46 lanterns attached to bamboo poles weighing 60kg (132lbs) that is then balanced on various parts of the body.

The Kanto is balanced first on the palm, then the forehead, shoulder, and finally the hip to the music of taiko drums.  Chiropractic care must be a booming business in Akita.

The kanto do fall frequently, especially on a windy day.

We couldn’t stay for the main procession of kanto held at night, since all hotels rooms in Akita and surrounding areas have been fully booked since last year.  We headed back to Morioka and then onto Hachinohe.  Hachinohe is currently the northern most stop of the bullet train until service to Aomori starts in a couple of years.  Hachinohe is a harbor town…which sounded like good sushi…it was excellent especially the uni sushi with 2 types of uni.

This entry was posted in dining, Japan, matsuri, Tohoku, travel. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Akita Kanto Matsuri

  1. Pingback: Yanaka « Pursuing Wabi

  2. 妻ですが says:

    角館で稲庭うどん食べようと思ったんだけど、まだ開いてなくて、新幹線で秋田へ(恐るべし、JRパスの力でしょ)。西部のデパ地下にある稲庭うどんを目指して行ったら、その前の広場で竿燈祭りのイベント、ナマハゲのライブコンサートがやってて、大感激。会いたかったのよ、ナマハゲー。竿燈祭りはごらんのようにすごい技の競演。首とか腰とか壊れないのでしょうか、このおじさんたちは。

    あ、この日の夜は八戸に泊まったんだけど、お寿司やさん「磯源」はおいしかったぞ。おまかせでまた食べすぎ。

  3. Pingback: Takamatsu « Pursuing Wabi

  4. Pingback: Remembering Matsushima « Pursuing Wabi

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